Hollywood, Religious Groups Share Rocky History

By Sotonoff, Jamie | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), May 18, 2006 | Go to article overview

Hollywood, Religious Groups Share Rocky History


Sotonoff, Jamie, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Jamie Sotonoff Daily Herald Staff Writer

Hollywood used to shy away from movies that would offend Catholics.

That was, until 1953, when the movie "The Moon is Blue" debuted.

The film used the words "virgin," "pregnant," "seduce" and contained the infamous line: "Isn't it better for a girl to be preoccupied with sex rather than occupied by it?"

The subject matter was considered so risque at the time, The Legion of Decency - the Catholic movie review organization - stirred up all sorts of controversy and officially "condemned" the film.

"People said, 'With that Legion of Decency rating, it's going to die at the box office.' But it was a huge hit," said Ron Falzone, professor of film and video at Columbia College Chicago. "That's when (Hollywood) realized, hey, we don't need this group's approval."

It's been a slippery slope ever since.

Controversial movies have been around as long as the art itself. In other words, the controversy surrounding this weekend's opening of "The Da Vinci Code" is nothing new.

And like "The Moon is Blue," "The Da Vinci Code" - based on a book that has sold more then 40 million copies - has the makings of a box-office hit.

As you may recall, some Christians didn't like the use of witchcraft in the "Harry Potter" movies. Catholics protested the relationship between Jesus and Mary Magdalene in "The Last Temptation of Christ." And Jewish groups objected to the way Mel Gibson's "The Passion of the Christ" portrayed the role of Jews in Jesus' death.

Many less obvious films have riled up religious groups, too - movies like "Wedding Crashers" or "Bad Santa." We didn't hear about those complaints, though.

That's because with so many potentially "offensive" movies being made, religious groups have learned to pick and choose their battles with Hollywood. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Hollywood, Religious Groups Share Rocky History
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.