Newsmakers: Mischa Barton, Paul McCartney

Newsweek, May 29, 2006 | Go to article overview

Newsmakers: Mischa Barton, Paul McCartney


Byline: Ramin Setoodeh, David Gates

This year's season finales went for big cliffhangers, but only "The OC" killed its star. Ramin Setoodeh spoke to Mischa Barton.

I wanted to offer my condolences.

Mischa Barton: Well, I was really excited that I get to die, to be honest. I've done pretty much everything else with the character. It was better than one of those lame farewells.

Will you ever return in a dream sequence?

Oh, God. I hope not. That would be cheesy.

Was it your decision to leave the show?

No. It was the producers'. But I really think it's best to do movies now. I was also thinking of spending a month in London, living there and taking a course in acting.

But you're already an actress.

Sometimes it's nice to go back to your roots.

Your voice sounds deeper than it does on TV.

I have a general transatlantic accent, I suppose. I'm nothing like my character. Are you kidding? I was born in London, raised in New York. She's crazy. I don't understand how anybody could be like her.

You're in New York for the day. Will you go shopping?

I shop very sporadically. I wouldn't say it's a hobby of mine. I also get given a lot of stuff. I'm lucky to be me, I suppose. [To someone in the room ] Careful. I have a dog. Please don't let her out.

Who are you talking to?

Room service. I'm in a hotel right now, and I have the puppy with me.

Are you going to walk her?

Yes. She's never seen SoHo or Tribeca, and I grew up there, so I feel it's necessary. But it's horrible, because she's way too little to put down. I have to walk around with her in my arms, and I look like one of those girls who has a small dog. …

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Newsmakers: Mischa Barton, Paul McCartney
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