Using Population Education for Career Choice

By Leventhal, Jerome I. | Techniques, May 2006 | Go to article overview

Using Population Education for Career Choice


Leventhal, Jerome I., Techniques


As students consider career choices in relation to the world around them, sharing information about the growth and development of population is very significant. Population issues reflect how the human race has grown and shaped the world around us. In the classroom, teachers are able to use this information in economics, civics, career selection, real-world math, ecology, geography, anthropology, biology and history. Materials and activities related to these issues can be used in K-12 settings.

Information and materials about population growth and the effects on jobs and the economy are very important in helping students plan careers and employment. Students and educators are able to apply this information to a wide variety of classroom activities. One organization that provides such resources is Population Connection (www.populationeducation.org), a national population education program with a strong emphasis on teacher training for pre-K-12 education. Its materials can be used in teaching/ learning activities, guidance and curriculum development.

For example, the resources and materials from Population Connection might be used to describe how limited productive resources affect the amount of goods and services people want, or they can be used to identify careers that are appropriate in different societies based on the standards of living. Educators can use them in the classroom to help students plan career options for our growing 21st century world.

The packets of information that are available to teachers include student materials, slide shows, worksheets, reading materials, games and classroom activities.

Population Connection divides its material by grade levels (K-two, three-five, six-eight and nine-12) and by subject (language arts, math, science and social studies).

They are also categorized by themes and concepts.

"Environmental Connections" has activities that explore how human numbers and actions affect the availability of natural resources on Earth and the quality of our environment. …

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