POLICE DRAW A BLANK ON KATE; No One Will Give Evidence in Cocaine Inquiry

The Evening Standard (London, England), May 26, 2006 | Go to article overview

POLICE DRAW A BLANK ON KATE; No One Will Give Evidence in Cocaine Inquiry


Byline: RICHARD EDWARDS;ROBERT MENDICK

POLICE have failed to find any witnesses who are willing to testify that they saw Kate Moss snorting cocaine at a London recording studio.

The final file has been submitted to the Crown Prosecution Service, which is expected to decide within the next 10 days whether to charge the 32-year-old supermodel.

It marks the end of an eight-month police investigation which it is estimated cost at least [pounds sterling]100,000.

Moss was interviewed by police under caution on 31 January. It is believed she refused to answer questions on any specific allegations concerning what happened in the studio four months earlier.

It is now feared the refusal of witnesses to give evidence to detectives seriously undermines the chances of a successful prosecution. Police believe they have accounted for all the people in the studio on the night Moss was caught on a hidden camera allegedly snorting cocaine.

But none has given an eyewitness account, including sound engineers at the Metropolis studio in Chiswick where Moss's on-off boyfriend Pete Doherty was recording a new album with his band Babyshambles.

The Evening Standard has spoken to one witness who claims Moss was secretly filmed by a onetime close acquaintance of Doherty.

It is thought he then sold the tape to the Daily Mirror for about [pounds sterling]150,000.

But the witness has refused to "go on the record" and confirm his story to detectives.

Images of Moss appeared in the Mirror in September, prompting her to quit Britain temporarily and spend a month in an addiction treatment clinic in the US.

Police still believe they have compiled enough evidence to secure a conviction against Moss but fear the case will never come to court.

One police source said: "It's a no-win situation. If she is prosecuted people will say 'why pick on her and not the thousands of other drug users in London? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

POLICE DRAW A BLANK ON KATE; No One Will Give Evidence in Cocaine Inquiry
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.