Works from Members of the Radical Teacher Collective

Radical Teacher, Winter 2005 | Go to article overview

Works from Members of the Radical Teacher Collective


Based on Pepi Leistyna's forthcoming book, Class Dismissed is a documentary navigating the steady stream of narrow working class representations from American television's beginnings to today's sitcoms, reality shows, police dramas, and daytime talk shows. Featuring interviews with media analysts and cultural historians, this documentary examines the patterns inherent in TV's disturbing depictions of working class people, stereotypical portrayals that reinforce the myth of meritocracy. For further information, email videosinproduction@mediaed.org; to order, call 800-897-0089.

In The Ellis Island Snow Globe, Erica Rand, author of Barbie's Queer Accessories, takes readers on an unconventional tour of Ellis Island, the migration station turned heritage museum, and its neighbor, the Statue of Liberty. By pausing to reflect on what is and is not on display at these two iconic national monuments, Rand focuses attention on whose heritage is being honored and whose obscured. She also reveals the shifting connections between sex, money, material products, and ideas of the nation. In her book, Rand synthesizes numerous diverse ideas about tourism immigration history, sexuality, race, ethnicity, commodity culture, and global capitalism. …

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