Political Platform of the Democratic Progressive Party

World Affairs, Winter 1993 | Go to article overview

Political Platform of the Democratic Progressive Party


Editor's Note: The following are excerpts from the political platform of the Democratic Progressive party, which was adopted by the First National Congress of the party on 10 November 1986 and modified by the First Additional Conference of the Second National Congress of the party on 17 April 1988. Please note that many of the suggestions contained in "B. Action Platform" have since been realized.

A. Basic Platform - Our Basic Suggestions

(A) Political Order Based on Democracy

and Freedom

A democratic and free nation should reject any form of violence and autocracy and establish itself on a legal and political basis that respects the free will of the majority and the principle of self-determination. It should protect basic human rights, popular sovereignty, division of power, rule of law, judiciary independence, equal status for all political parties and should have a responsible administrative system. Over the past 30 to 40 years, the government has never conducted an overall election of central parliamentarians. The principles of the Constitution [have] been seriously distorted as a result of the imposition of martial law and "the Temporary Provisions Effective During the Period of Communist Rebellion." For this reason, we suggest that the government:

1. Maintain human dignity and basic human rights: People are the core of the nation and the social system. People do not live to serve the nation or the social system, but rather the nation and the social system exist mainly to serve the people. We believe that all legal, judiciary, administrative, economic and social systems [are] tools for maintaining human dignity and basic human rights. Human dignity and basic human rights should be protected by the Constitution and should never be restricted by any law. Freedoms of thinking, religious belief, and academic research should never be restricted by any law. Laws that restrict the freedom of speech, the press, assembly and association should never exceed more than what is necessary.

2. Ensure the popular [sic] of people's sovereignty: People are the source of all political power in a nation. The parliament is entrusted by the people to perform duties on their behalf for a definite period of time and elections should be conducted on a regular basis to allow people to elect council members at all levels. Any law passed by the parliament should comply with the people's wish. The enactment and execution of laws and policies must be legal and justifiable; otherwise, people may resist them. The government is responsible to the people and the people have the right to supervise and change their government. The people have the right to determine the form of the government and the direction of future political development.

3. Set up a sound system for division of power and for checks and balances. Government organizations at various levels should be able to supervise one another. Equitable distribution of power and checks and balances should be set up among central and local governments to ensure the implementation of local autonomy.

4. Set up a sound system for the implementation of party politics. Cooperation among political parties to form the will of the people is indispensable in constitutional rule. The principles of freedom, equality and democracy for all political parties should be upheld in this political system.

5. Confirm the value of freedoms of assembly and recognize the importance of popular political and social movements. In a pluralistic society, freedoms of assembly and of association [are] basic rights of the people. The government should never infringe upon such rights but rather should encourage people to initiate movements that facilitate communication between the people and the government. This kind of communication will reduce problems caused by the inappropriate execution of government power, the monopolization of markets by captalists and collaboration among bureaucrats and businessmen. …

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