Man Gets 14 Years for Meth Lab Judge Chastises Rose for Wasting Smarts

By Gutowski, Christy | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), May 24, 2006 | Go to article overview

Man Gets 14 Years for Meth Lab Judge Chastises Rose for Wasting Smarts


Gutowski, Christy, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Christy Gutowski Daily Herald Legal Affairs Writer

If a mind is a terrible thing to waste, then the case of Stuart W. Rose is a real tragedy.

At 42, he had the training to be a lawyer, electrical engineer and patent agent. Colleagues raved about his recent biophysics research for the University of Illinois, his alma mater, while working on his doctorate.

Instead, Rose is going to a state prison for trying to set up a dangerous methamphetamine lab in his Lisle apartment.

DuPage Circuit Judge Robert Anderson noted Rose's wasted brilliance Tuesday in meting out a 14-year prison term. Rose is eligible for parole after serving half the sentence.

"There's an old saying that to those who were given much, much is expected," said the judge, lamenting the lost potential. "It's a significant sentence and it ought to be for what you did."

It's at least the third prison sentence Anderson has meted out this month for home meth labs. The drug is more addictive than cocaine and even heroin, and authorities are seeing it far more often in Chicago, downstate and the suburbs.

Although defense attorney Jack Donahue noted Rose's many efforts to improve his life since his arrest, such as working toward a doctorate, prosecutor Paul Marchese argued the defendant has run out of second chances.

Rose was on probation for a 1995 drug possession arrest in California when nabbed again in 1998 for running a meth lab in Glen Ellyn. …

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