Guide to Life

Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England), June 5, 2006 | Go to article overview

Guide to Life


Byline: By Jayne Goldsmith

Wendy's story

When the opportunity first came my way to write a weekly column for the Chronicle I was thrilled. My intention was to write what I felt were inspirational stories that would also be thought-provoking. I wanted to help and encourage people to come to understand that no matter how challenging life situations can be, we all have choices and ways to help ourselves.

The Evening Chronicle then decided to name my column Guide to Life, so I thought to myself, what do I know? Whatever I know or have learnt in life I share because I believe we can learn so much from each other.

One of my clients who inspires me is a wonderful woman called Wendy. She recently attended my InsideOut course, and is a very content and different woman today.

I asked her if I could share her story with you, and this is it ...

It all started when I was diagnosed with viral pneumonia ( I was very ill for some time ( but then I did not recover properly. I was admitted to hospital and had a lot of tests done ( they were all negative. That was when I was finally diagnosed with ME. Back in those days it wasn't recognised at all and my doctor was only able to offer me antidepressants. I was not happy with the whole situation and refused to leave his surgery until he gave me the bottom line. Eventually after some time he told me: "I have seen people like you end up in a wheelchair" ( I was struck dumb ( and then asked "What can I do about it? …

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