Clinical Rheumatology from SilverPlatter Education

By Rosen, Linda | Information Today, October 1993 | Go to article overview

Clinical Rheumatology from SilverPlatter Education


Rosen, Linda, Information Today


This disc was designed to provide training in the identification of disease-associated images in rheumatology. Using a multimedia format, the user may display representative color images or view X-ray changes typical of one of the rheumatic disorders.

The images are accompanied by a short text and a sound-byte giving a detailed explanation of the nature of the abnormalities. Care has been taken to indicate how to differentiate each particular abnormality from other illnesses and the user may access normal images for immediate comparison. Each disorder is accompanied by an in-context bibliography. The bibliography is easy to print out and use to find current journal articles and research on the topic.

Clinical Rheumatology, which is currently only available in PC format, provides images and commentary of the following conditions:

* Osteoarthritis/DJD

* Rheumatoid Arthritis

* Crystal-induced Disease

* Serongative Arthritis

* Connective Tissue Diseases

* Infectious Arthritis

* Miscellaneous Conditions

This disc is one in a series produced by SilverPlatter Education under their Multimedia Accelerated Learning program. Upcoming discs in the series will include:

* The Nature of Genes (Macintosh format, perhaps also PC)

* Etiology of Cancer (Macintosh format)

* Pediatric Airway Obstruction (Macintosh format)

American Medical Television, in cooperation with the American Medical Association, has entered into an agreement with SilverPlatter to generate a large number of educational multimedia products on CD-ROM. This agreement provides a forum for the creation, review, and distribution of high quality medical multimedia content. As part of the process, American Medical Television and the American Medical Association are seeking input from medical specialty groups on editorial direction and identification of potential multimedia authors, as well as broader levels of involvement.

This product was extremely easy to install using Windows and Program Manager. It is very important that 256 colors be used with your video card or images on the disc will not display properly. Some of the conditions displayed take full advantage of the 256 color capability. The graphic displays can be rather disturbing for those not used to these disorders.

The program opens with a choice of reviewing the Program Instructions or beginning the Program. It is clear from the very beginning of the program that the screen design and overall user interface design has been implemented with simplicity and ease-of-use in mind. During the Program Instructions, a narrator tells you how to use the program. Animation shows how to navigate. One of the most striking aspects of this program is the uncluttered screens and simple instructions. Multimedia discs are often filled with an over abundance of instructions, buttons, menus and choices. This program is simple, clear and full of stunning color images. The main menu includes seven main selections on various rheumatic conditions. Each selection moves onto another uncluttered screen usually offering three choices for exploration: Clinical, Laboratory, and X-ray. …

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