Long-Lived Worm Hints at Genetics of Aging

By Strobel, Gabrielle | Science News, December 4, 1993 | Go to article overview

Long-Lived Worm Hints at Genetics of Aging


Strobel, Gabrielle, Science News


Who hasn't dreamed of extending his or her life span?

A lowly worm can do just that. The tiny nematode Caenorhabditis elegans more than doubles its normal life expectancy when carrying a mutation in a gene called daf-2, announce researchers at the University of California, San Francisco.

Equivalent in age to a 150-year-old person, the daf-2 mutants appear healthy until a few days before their demise, says developmental biologist Cynthia Kenyon. Adult, fertile daf-2 mutants feed and move normally for about 60 days, while wild-type, or normal, worms die at about 25 days, Kenyon and her co-workers report in the Dec. 2 NATURE.

"This study is the first clear demonstration that aging in this worm is not a random degeneration event but is regulated by identifiable genes," comments geneticist James H. Thomas of the University of Washington in Seattle.

"It was striking to see how much faster the wild-type worms [aged]," Kenyon says. "When the wild type aged, they lost their muscle tonus, looked flaccid and decrepit. At that time, the mutants still looked young and zipped around."

In normal nematodes, Kenyon says, the daf-2 gene acts as a brake on a second gene, daf-16, located further downstream in the DNA. In worms lacking daf-16, the daf-2 mutation does not prolong life, suggesting that both genes are involved in regulating the rate of aging.

That finding may give researchers a handle on unlocking the genetics of aging in mammals, Kenyon adds. "We'd like to find the counterparts [of daf-2 and daf-16] in mammals. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Long-Lived Worm Hints at Genetics of Aging
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.