Fighting to Win: 34th Annual Report on the Nation's Largest Black-Owned Business

Black Enterprise, June 2006 | Go to article overview

Fighting to Win: 34th Annual Report on the Nation's Largest Black-Owned Business


Champions. Contenders. Down For the Count. These categories best characterize the companies that constitute the BE 100S--the nation's largest black-owned businesses. One common trait they all share is a fighting spirit.

These enterprises--from the top-ranked black industrial/ service companies to the leading African American financial services firms--all fought for revenue growth, market share, and improved profitability in a rough-and-tumble business arena. They've had to protect their companies against the shocks of war, escalating oil prices, rising interest rates, no-holds-barred competition, and life-altering natural disasters. Of these, Hurricane Katrina presented the greatest difficulty. Most companies met the challenge by fine-tuning their business models through acquisitions and divestitures, strategic partnerships, development of new lines of commerce, and recruitment of A-list management talent.

Despite the poor performance of the domestic automotive industry, which hurt legions of black auto dealers and suppliers, sales for the BE INDUSTRIAL/SERVICE 100 and BE AUTO DEALER 100 indicated a significant increase. These BE 100S companies produced a 13% increase in combined revenues, up from $23.2 billion in 2004 to $26.3 billion in 2005. In fact, the sales growth leader was Troy, Michigan-based automotive supplier TAG Holdings L.L.C. (No. 14 on the BE INDUSTRIAL/SERVICE 100 list), which showed a 230% boost in sales, from $103 million in 2004 to $340 million in 2005. Between the two lists, 27 companies grossed more than $200 million in revenues and, for the first time in black business history, three posted more than $1 billion in revenues: World Wide Technology and CAMAC International--the list leaders on the BE INDUSTRIAL/SERVICE 100--and Prestige Automotive--No. 1 on the BE AUTO DEALER 100 list. "We showed growth across all of our sectors," says David Steward, CEO of WWT, which produced revenues of $1.85 billion. "Next year, we will exceed $2 billion in revenues, and I'm not just being bullish." If Steward's claim holds true, WWT will be the second black-owned business in history to break the $2 billion barrier. The first was TLC Beatrice International Holdings exactly a decade ago.

In addition, as a group, our industrial/service companies and auto dealers slightly expanded their employee ranks. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Fighting to Win: 34th Annual Report on the Nation's Largest Black-Owned Business
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.