Space Station: Merger with the Russians

Science News, December 11, 1993 | Go to article overview

Space Station: Merger with the Russians


NASA's decade-long struggle to build a space station has taken a new international twist.

President Clinton announced on Nov. 29 his support for building a space station jointly with the Russians. Some components of the proposed station, scheduled for completion in 2001, would come from parts originally meant for MIR-2, the planned second generation of the Russian space station now in orbit. The U.S.-Russian collaboration was one of several proposals suggested by NASA earlier this year after the White House ordered the agency to come up with a less costly design (SN: 6/19/93, p.389).

The call for Russian participation has political overtones. The United States wanted to reward its former Cold War enemy for promising to back out of selling missile technology to India. Nonetheless, the White House's approval of the joint venture is "a fundamental decision in the history of space policy," says John M. Logsdon, a space policy analyst at George Washington University in Washington, D.C.

Marcia Smith, an analyst with the Congressional Research Service in Washington, D.C., sees things differently She says the proposal "may be good for U.S. foreign policy; I'm skeptical that its going to be good for space policy"

The first phase of the plan would give NASA access to the existing MIR space station, allowing scientists to test equipment designed for the new space station. Between 1995 and 1997, the United States would launch 10 shuttle missions to dock with MIR; U.S. astronauts would spend three to six months aboard the craft. Some shuttle missions would repair and refuel MIR, ensuring that it remains in orbit through 1997.

In mid-1997, U.S. and Russian crews would begin the second phase, assembling in space the nucleus of the new space station. In the final phase, astronauts would construct the truss that will hold the stations solar arrays and laboratory modules built by Japan and several European countries. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Space Station: Merger with the Russians
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.