Marilyn Monroe Marries Arthur Miller: June 29th, 1956

History Today, June 2006 | Go to article overview

Marilyn Monroe Marries Arthur Miller: June 29th, 1956


In the early months of 1956 Marilyn Monroe was preparing to star in Bus Stop, discussing with Laurence Olivier a role in The Prince and the Showgirl and romancing Arthur Miller, who was divorcing his wife, Mary. She was also formally changing her name from Norma Jeane Mortenson to Marilyn Monroe and being attacked by red-baiters for associating with the playwright, an alleged Communist sympathizer. In February Walter Winchell broadcast an item about 'America's best-known blonde moving picture star'. Said to have been directly inspired by J. Edgar Hoover himself, it described her as 'now the darling of the left wing intelligentsia, several of whom are listed as Red fronters'.

The filming of Bus Stop was completed by the end of May. Miller's Reno divorce came through in June and Marilyn joined him in New York, besieged by swarms of pressmen. On June 29th they held a press conference at Miller's house in Roxbury, Connecticut, whose local newspaper had dryly announced the day before, 'Local Resident Will Marry Miss Monroe of Hollywood', adding, 'Roxbury Only Spot in World to Greet News Calmly'.

Once the 400 pressmen had gone away, the couple sneaked off to the Westchester County Court House in nearby White Plains, where they were married by Judge Seymour Rabinowitz shortly before 7.30 pm in a ceremony that lasted all of four minutes. The bride was thirty years old to the groom's forty. Miller's cousin, Morty Miller and his wife, were the witnesses and there was not a solitary pressman or flash camera in sight. …

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Marilyn Monroe Marries Arthur Miller: June 29th, 1956
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