Tea Time for Your Health


For many years tea has been associated with positive health benefits. There are many varieties of tea. All tea comes from the Camellia sinensis plant, the fresh leaves of the tea plant are processed and the their level of contact with oxygen determine the type of tea. When oxidation takes place, tea leaves undergo natural chemical reaction that results in distinctive characteristics, color and taste.

Green tea is not oxidized, and the leaves are steamed, rolled and dried, very little processing. On the other hand, black tea is allowed to oxidize and is fully fermented during this processing. Oolong tea fails somewhere between green and black teas, in that the leaves are only partially oxidized. White tea is picked and harvested before the leaves open fully, and the buds are still covered by white hair.

Herbal teas do not come from the Camellia sinensis, but are an infusion of leaves, roots, bark, seeds or flowers of other plants. Like wines, tea takes its name from the district in which it grows. There are many kinds of black tea, green tea, and white tea.

Tips For Brewing Tea

* Use one tea bag, or 2 to 4 grams of tea per cup. Fill a kettle with cold water and bring to a boil. Turn off kettle or remove from heat, and allow it to stand for up to 3 minutes. Pour the heated water over the tea bag or tea, and allow it to steep for up to 3 minutes. If using a tea bag, remove the bag. Allow the tea to coot for three more minutes.

* It is very important that the tea is never allowed to over infuse. That will produce distasteful tea. If you want stronger tea, add more leaves or bags, rather than infusing longer than recommended,

* Try to use loose-leaf tea whenever possible. The tea leaves in tea bags are usually broken, dusty bits of lesser quality tea leaves.

* It is best to boil fresh tap or bottled water (not distilled water) and avoid reusing water that has already been heated or boiled. This is flat water, which has been depleted of its oxygen and is not good for brewing a good cup of tea.

* A tea strainer or infuser basket is better for infusing loose-leaf tea [rather than a tea ball or clamping spoon) so that the leaves have plenty of room to expand and fully infuse

* If you are serious, buy a beverage thermometer to make sure you are brewing your tea at the appropriate temperature. Using water that is too cool, or too hot, can ruin a good cup of tea. Black teas brew best with water at the boiling point and green teas should use water at 160-180 degrees. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Tea Time for Your Health
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.