Luisa Lambri: Luhring Augustine Gallery

By Sholis, Brian | Artforum International, Summer 2006 | Go to article overview

Luisa Lambri: Luhring Augustine Gallery


Sholis, Brian, Artforum International


For her New York solo debut, Italian photographer Luisa Lambri presented a four-year minisurvey consisting of just seventeen photographs, and the restrained selection underscored the importance of editing to her practice. Lambri spends considerable time in each of the modernist buildings--primarily private residences--that she photographs, taking hundreds of pictures. Yet only a few of these are ever printed and exhibited, and they are not conventional architectural photographs in the vein of, say, Julius Shulman's glamorous images of Case Study Houses or Candida Hofer's typological surveys of magnificent interiors (both of which would otherwise seem obvious precedents here). Lambri's idiosyncratic documents, often depicting individual windows or glass-curtain walls, are more somatic than panoramic, attending closely to the phenomenology of the built environment. Most architectural photographs posit the viewer as disembodied voyeur, but Lambri's images place the body in space. Her pictures register her slight shifts in position as well as subtle changes in light, and both characteristics give her grouped images a sense of the passage of time in a manner that recalls Jan Dibbets's "Interior Light" studies.

The main gallery featured images of Luis Barragan's Casa Barragan (1947), Marcel Breuer's Whitney Museum of American Art (1966), and Konstantin Melnikov's Melnikov House (1927), although only architecture buffs would recognize these buildings in Lambri's shots. All six pictures of Barragan's Mexico City home, taken in 2005, focus on one window, which is covered by a wooden shutter divided into four cabinet-like doors. Lambri treats this window like a camera lens, opening the doors to varying degrees in order to admit different amounts of light. In four pictures, a prolonged exposure blanches the image, and the light surges between the cracks with an otherworldly radiance. The possible permutations are seemingly infinite, and endlessly rewarding. In the other two, the surrounding wall reasserts its solidity, framing a garden view that incorporates some pink flowers, the only bright color in the exhibition. …

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