State of Journalism Education; (Part 2)

Manila Bulletin, July 8, 2006 | Go to article overview

State of Journalism Education; (Part 2)


Byline: Florangel Rosario Braid

A PRIORITY issue raised during the UNESCO Consultative Meeting in Paris was that of redefining the mission and functions of journalism and to realign the curricula with this new philosophy. The two areas of reform which would respond to globalization and the "revolutionary" impact of technology are the inclusion of a core course on the fundamentals of digital journalism or online journalism; and the active utilization of the digital technologies to improve the learning process.

Citing as example the Knight Center Experience, a distance learning program for mid-career journalists from Latin America and the Caribbean, the four-to-six week courses included computer-assisted reporting, mathematics for journalists, newsroom management, coverage of armed conflicts, and reporting public administration. The experiment proved cost-effective compared with traditional training programs which involved higher costs for travel, lodging and equipment. The evaluation results were positive and among others, showed that technology can enhance and extend the learning experience; that open source (public domain) software programs can be as effective as proprietary programs which are covered by copyright, and that online learning can be combined with the traditional approaches. Online courses are interactive, participatory and provide more flexibility in terms of content and time. The latter is a positive factor for working journalists who do not have time to attend classroom courses. The modular approach in online learning likewise facilitates development of journalism educators in the three areas of teaching, practice, and research.

Core competencies include the ability to critique structural issues affecting mass media -- media concentration, diversity, dependence on advertising, etc. The course on democracy would highlight rights and "entitlements," social responsibility, and justice. Research is an important component considering the need to increase the credibility of news and public affairs programs.

It was further suggested that the methodology in both education and training should start by identifying the various partners or stakeholders -- graduates, markets, and journalism schools. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

State of Journalism Education; (Part 2)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.