Nanjing Oklahoma Move 'A Classic' an American Love Affair and Hard-Nosed Economics Should Ensure Production of MGs in the United States Is a Success, as Manufacturing Editor John Revill Reports

The Birmingham Post (England), July 12, 2006 | Go to article overview

Nanjing Oklahoma Move 'A Classic' an American Love Affair and Hard-Nosed Economics Should Ensure Production of MGs in the United States Is a Success, as Manufacturing Editor John Revill Reports


Byline: John Revill

The move by Nanjing Automobile Corporation to set up a factory in the US shows the company's ambition to be a global automotive player.

The American public's love affair with the MG brand could also prove the making of the Oklahoma venture, according to Peter Cooke, KPMG professor of automotive industry management at Nottingham Business School.

"This is the classic behaviour of a global automotive player. If you want to be a global player these days you have to have sites in North America, Europe and Asia," said Prof Cooke.

"The common wisdom is also if you are assembling in a local market, that gives you market share, because people regard you as a local player."

The strong brand of MG would make it attractive in America again, Prof Cooke added. "The MG brand has been damaged by the MG Rover collapse, and this is probably the last time it could be relaunched again in America.

"But in America the MG name is still powerful for sports cars and niche cars. Of course they will have to produce something special."

Nanjing Automobile would have to work hard to make sure the new vehicles passed the federal safety standards which eventually led to the MGB being withdrawn from sale in 1980.

Nanjing will rely heavily on the expertise of major suppliers to meet global quality, emissions and safety standards. MG, short for Morris Garages, got its start in 1923 building sporty versions of Morris economy cars.

The first MGs came to the United States in volume in 1947 and began the British sports car craze. They were sold at US dealerships until 1980.

Oklahoma would prove attractive to NAC because of subsidies which would be available from the American government, while it also had a good location in the centre of the US. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Nanjing Oklahoma Move 'A Classic' an American Love Affair and Hard-Nosed Economics Should Ensure Production of MGs in the United States Is a Success, as Manufacturing Editor John Revill Reports
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.