Web-Powered Job Recruiting: Online Teacher Recruiting Saves Time, Money and Resources

By Dyrli, Odvard Egil | District Administration, July 2006 | Go to article overview

Web-Powered Job Recruiting: Online Teacher Recruiting Saves Time, Money and Resources


Dyrli, Odvard Egil, District Administration


For several years, William Singleton, superintendent of South Carolina's Jasper County School District, has traveled to job fairs in other states to recruit teachers, particularly in math, science and special education. Armed with $2,500 signing bonuses to sweeten the pot, Singleton recently joined more than 250 other recruiters in New York towns with large teacher education pools, including Buffalo and Rochester. Similarly, administrators in Montgomery County, Md., sent representatives to job fairs in Massachusetts, Minnesota and Ohio, and this year educators in Fairfax County, Va., made 38 recruiting trips in 10 states.

Such efforts are deemed necessary in the present job market, especially for critical content areas and hard-to-staff schools. This situation is only expected to get worse. About 42 percent of the nation's 2.9 million teachers are near retirement age, and the U.S. Department of Education says more than a million replacement teachers will be needed by 2008.

These recruitment pressures affect every school district, and force administrators to cast wider nets to find qualified applicants. But while recruiting trips are expensive and time-consuming, and traditional print advertising has a limited reach, growing numbers of districts are turning to the Internet.

Online Marketplaces

Since teacher placement is a gigantic market, there are countless numbers of free, fee-based, and in some cases even fraudulent Web sites to match employers and applicants. Most districts post jobs on specialized school-related sites. For example, Administrators.net offers a link to a searchable job center where administrators can post openings and teachers can post resumes. Similarly, online professional association job banks, including NSTA.org for science and NCTM.org for math, are prime locations to seek applicants in content areas.

But the quality of the district Web site is a key factor in attracting online applicants, and it is surprising how many administrators are not taking advantage of this powerful recruiting tool. …

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