Post-Solidarity Poland Falters: Catholicism and Capitalism Create Skepticism

By Hebblethwaite, Peter | National Catholic Reporter, February 11, 1994 | Go to article overview

Post-Solidarity Poland Falters: Catholicism and Capitalism Create Skepticism


Hebblethwaite, Peter, National Catholic Reporter


Catholicism and capitalism create skepticism

OXFORD, England -- Pope John Paul had practically nothing to say about the Polish elections last September, when the renamed communists swept aside the parties based on Solidarity. He broke his silence on Christmas Eve, when he met a group of Polish pilgrims headed by Szczepan Wesoly, auxiliary bishop of Gniezno.

Wesoly, in his address of welcome, set the tone of perplexed lamentation: "We beg pardon, Holy Father, because the recent elections show that we Poles have not sufficiently listened to your teachings."

Poland has let the pope down.

John Paul replied in the same vein: "We give thanks for all that our Polish Solidarity represented in the 1980s and ask pardon because we were unable to defend this great good."

It was like a collective act of penance, an act of general repentance that otherwise the pope does not like. The defeat has made John Paul momentarily pensive, hesitant, faltering.

"We pray," he said, "that we do not repeat the mistakes of our fathers, that we know how to make good use of our liberty, that we may serve each other and the common good.

"We pray especially that those who govern our country may have the ability to make good use of freedom. ... In the past, the search for one's own profit has cost us too much, and we don't want it to take root in our social and political life."

Which past was he evoking here? And what were the mistakes of the fathers? It remains unclear. But praying is all that is left to do for Poland.

He prayed that the mass media "may not destroy the souls and the consciences of Poles."

He prayed that "love of one's country" might grow among Poles, but without giving way to nationalism, xenophobia or anti-Semitism.

He prayed that "families might be faithful to life," evoking the "difficult problem that faces so many Polish consciences, that of children not yet born being threatened in their very existence." Abortion is a problem in Poland.

Last March, a restrictive law on abortion was passed, and the church hailed it as a victory (though not a complete one). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Post-Solidarity Poland Falters: Catholicism and Capitalism Create Skepticism
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.