Ephraim Hardcastle

Daily Mail (London), July 19, 2006 | Go to article overview

Ephraim Hardcastle


GEORGE W Bush's unscripted remarks to Tony Blair at St Petersburg show the true nature of their relationship - head boy and school acolyte. Publicly Bush is a folksy faux Texan; privately he's an alumnus of posh Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts, and Yale University where - as with Blair's alma mater, Fettes - students address each other by their surnames.

Hence his 'Yo, Blair'. The Prime Minister's gift of a sweater to Bush - and the latter's sarcastic comment, 'I know you picked it out yourself' followed by Blair's response of 'Absolutely' - is classic posh school greasing. Bush emerges as a card; Blair, alas, as a creep. Oh the embarrassment.

HOLLYWOOD actress Jennifer Aniston ( pictured) is famous here largely because she was dumped by Brad Pitt in favour of Angelina Jolie. But she faced no questions on this topic when she was royally hosed down with treacle on Channel 4's Richard & Judy Show. She was told how much everyone loved her, including the simpering hosts. 'I'm so flattered,' she purred. Pass the Prescott-sized sickbag!

LAST night Tory MP Boris Johnson spoke on Radio 7's Great Inspirations series about his idol, Greek historian Thucydides. Pretentious Boris does have a genuine passion for the ancient Greeks. Sometimes he uses them to further his romantic ambitions. A lady friend says: 'He's not above sending to those he is pursuing books of Greek love poems with his own inscriptions - also in ancient Greek - on the title page. …

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