Teaching Art to Students with Emotional/behavioral Disorders

By De Chiara, Edith | School Arts, February 1994 | Go to article overview

Teaching Art to Students with Emotional/behavioral Disorders


De Chiara, Edith, School Arts


It is not possible to learn the skills needed for teaching art to special-needs students in a few sessions of a standard art-methods course. Art education students require a separate course to teach students with specific disorders. The need for such a course is substantiated by factors such as the dramatic increase in the number of students identified as handicapped, mainstreaming, and Regular Education Initiative (REI), a movement to integrate classes of regular and special education students to better and more economically serve all students. As a result, art teachers will be responsible for the education of increasing numbers of handicapped students. The critical issue is determining the most expedient way to prepare teachers to meet this challenge.

Categories of Learners

Special-education literature generally categorizes handicapped learners as mentally retarded, physically impaired or emotionally disturbed. The category of mentally retarded can be broken down into mildly, moderately or severely retarded. The category of physically impaired can be broken down into learning disabled or orthopedically impaired, neurologically, visually or hearing impaired. Although there is no consensus for classifying the emotionally disturbed, some psychologists and educators recommended classifying them as suffering from conduct disorder, anxiety-withdrawal behavior, immaturity or socialized aggression (acting out), allowing for individual differences within each classification.

The Mainstreaming Course

In most teacher-preparation programs, a course in mainstreaming is now required for certification. This course is designed to introduce preservice teachers to the concept of mainstreaming, different handicapping conditions and the associated learning, social/emotional behavioral characteristics. The course focuses on practical methods and techniques for adapting various subject areas (math, social studies, science, language, music and art) for mainstreamed, handicapped students.

Although informative, the course has limited value. Student teachers need a course where they can gain hands-on experience with diverse populations of special-needs students, helping them to develop two important aspects of teaching handicapped students: skills and attitudes.

Art Methods for Special Education

In a course focusing on special education, each handicapping condition should be treated separately. The following format is suggested: definition and characteristics of the impairment; educational approaches; strategies for art programming; and suggested art media, materials and activities. Activities taught within each handicapping condition should address adaptation to meet group and individual needs. The following outlines emotional/behavioral disorders:

Definition and Characteristics of

Emotional/Behavioral Disorders.

This condition adversely affects students' educational and social experience and results in an inability to learn. Behavior deviates from age-appropriate norms, and range from immature or withdrawn behavior to aggressive acting out. This maladaptive behavior interferes with their development, and negatively impacts those with whom they interact, often making them social outcasts.

To be prepared to teach this population, it is critical that teachers develop attitudes different from those required for most students. It comes as no surprise that teachers with mainstreamed classes find these students to be the most undesirable. This attitude may be exacerbated by anxiety due to a lack of confidence and skills in managing these students. In this situation, skills in behavior management and adapting materials and techniques are critical.

Classroom Management. A classroom environment that is well-organized, highly structured, predictable, yet tolerant and flexible will prevent frustration and potential eruptions. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Teaching Art to Students with Emotional/behavioral Disorders
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.