A Tale of Two Leaders

By Friedman, Jerry W. | Policy & Practice, June 2006 | Go to article overview

A Tale of Two Leaders


Friedman, Jerry W., Policy & Practice


Once at a management meeting I heard an adage that "managers do things right while leaders do the right thing." I believe that in order to be truly successful in Public Human Services Administration, both principles are essential. Of the two, however, leadership is the most elusive. It is clearly more art than science, almost impossible to measure, and difficult to define. It's a little like the Supreme Court observation on obscenity--it's hard to explain, but you know it when you see it.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

I would like to share the story of two former co-workers who have achieved prominence and success in ways that seemed unimaginable when we started our careers together decades ago.

Last November, the voters of Northampton County, Pa., elected former Human Service Director John Stoffa as their county executive. John and I worked together at the county level in the 1980s. John emerged from retirement to seek the highest elected office in the county out of concern over poor government performance and a breakdown in communication and civility among elected officials. This was truly a David and Goliath story. Without party backing, John defeated a well-financed, highly endorsed, two-term incumbent in the primary election. The approach that led to this upset was remarkable. John had no paid advisers, accepted only small contributions from individuals, eschewed negative campaigning, and had no political platform other than his history of public service, common sense and a desire to do good. His election was a grass-roots effort in the finest tradition, with volunteers creating handmade signs and mimeographed fliers. It was a campaign that would make the political pundits, spin doctors and prognosticators cringe, but John's open "what you see is what you get" approach resonated with the voters and he won in a landslide.

I find this story to be refreshing and encouraging. Perhaps County Executive Stoffa's election contains a message that voters are eager to embrace an open campaign where character and ethics are the main drivers. Since taking office, John has forged new regional partnerships, opened up communications, and has crossed political party lines to appoint the most qualified individuals to fill key Cabinet posts.

Recently, President Bush nominated USDA Undersecretary Eric M. Bost as ambassador to South Africa. Eric and I have worked together for nearly two decades in different states and in different capacities. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Tale of Two Leaders
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.