Next Bet for Horse Racing: The Internet Industry Wants Online Betting Legalized

By Ryan, Joseph | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), July 19, 2006 | Go to article overview

Next Bet for Horse Racing: The Internet Industry Wants Online Betting Legalized


Ryan, Joseph, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Joseph Ryan Daily Herald Staff Writer

With their industry hobbling, Illinois horse racing interests are looking to put an off-track betting facility in every house - via the Internet.

Horse betting currently takes place in cyberspace largely illegally through a slew of unlicensed offshore and domestic sites. But state regulators, horse trainers and owners - including Arlington Park - want in on the action.

"The train is going to pull out of the station, and we won't be on it," said Richard Duchossois, Arlington Park's chairman, referring to the booming Internet gambling industry.

The comments came after the opening of an Illinois Racing Board hearing Tuesday in downtown Chicago on ways to improve the horse racing industry. The second of three hearings is scheduled for today.

The racing board plans to report back to lawmakers in the fall on suggestions for new gaming regulations, including the perennial issue of adding slot machines to racetracks, taxing casinos to subsidize racing, and licensing online horse betting sites.

Of the three, online horse betting is a relative newcomer in the annual struggle to increase interest in racing as well as boost its profitability. The move would be allowed under federal law, even if Congress forbids use of credit cards in other online gambling this summer. It is currently practiced in about 19 states.

Horse betting and lotteries are explicitly exempted from legislation passed by the U.S. House this month forbidding the use of credit cards in online gambling. But betting on horses with credit cards could become a political issue in Illinois, where credit wagering is banned at tracks and casinos and with the state lottery.

A losing bet

Horse track owners say the industry has been on a dive ever since casinos were added to the state in the early 1990s.

Even just over the past five years, the size of awards paid out to winners has plummeted from $108 million in 2000 to $92 million in 2005.

The awards are tied to the amount of bets wagered at tracks and off-track betting parlors. That amount has stayed stagnant at about $1 billion over the past 25 years. Factoring in inflation shows the amount wagered has actually dropped by $1.5 billion, according to Illinois Racing Board records.

"The horse racing industry is experiencing a serious decline over an accelerated rate," said Marc Laino, racing board director, as he outlined the figures before Tuesday's hearing.

When awards drop, so does the number of owners and trainers willing to run horses at Illinois tracks. And as horses decline, the interest of gamblers wanes because the potential payout takes a nose dive. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Next Bet for Horse Racing: The Internet Industry Wants Online Betting Legalized
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.