I Was Naive to Believe Publicity about 101

The Journal (Newcastle, England), August 7, 2006 | Go to article overview

I Was Naive to Believe Publicity about 101


Having always been a law abiding, civic minded sort of busybody, the launch of the new 101 system seemed like a good thing: a single number to report all sorts of anti-social shenanigans. Great idea!

I should have known it was only a publicity stunt when I read that "th' Gov'nmint" was behind it and, sure enough, 101 is another half-baked idea. Allegedly, if you report, say, consistent speeding in a 30mph limit, then one of Northumbria Police's Finest will contact you within two days to discuss the problem.

However, if more than one person in the same street reports the same thing, then that's counted as just one incident and only the first "reporter" will be contacted. Which means Reporters Two and Three and so on are simply left to think they've wasted their time.

Moral of the story: I was naive to believe the publicity about 101!

Miss SUSAN M WALTON, Gateshead

PS. The 30mph limit is still being broken.

Downpour led to amusing garden chase

DURING the recent torrential rain, a frog was enjoying itself on our lawn when it was spotted by a magpie.

A highly amusing chase ensued, with the magpie frantically trying to keep pace as the frog jumped left, right and centre; a slippery customer.

The frog won and is probably now smugly residing in next door's pond.

CAROL GLENWRIGHT, Gosforth, Newcastle

It is imperative that we find Mid East solution

WE all know a mini-argument between two countries led to an unstoppable war.

Was it pre-planned by Hezbollah with the intention of luring Israel into retaliating? Remember, the former captured two Israeli soldiers and refused attempts to return them.

Hence the development into the worst kind of conflict: religious coupled to attrition. It is snowballing and spreading throughout the Middle East and possibly further beyond the imagination.

Finding a solution is almost impossible, but it's most imperative that one is found one way or the other. Or else.

TM MARTIN, Amble, Northumberland

How long can Israel survive in Arab world?

THE recent statement by Hain Ramon, Israel's justice minister, that everyone remaining in southern Lebanon would be regarded as a terrorist and subjected to huge firepower, is a measure of Israel's arrogance.

The stopover at Prestwick by American planes carrying 5,000lb blockbuster bombs for use by the Israelis, is an example of American arrogance.

The Americans need to be disabused of the assumption they can use Britain as a base for their geopolitical ambitions while keeping us in the dark as to what they are up to.

But the fundamental question is, what on earth did we think we were doing when, in 1948, we acquiesced in the ending of the British mandate in Palestine and the proclamation of the state of Israel?

Did no one in the international community see the madness of inserting a Jewish state in to the Arab, Muslim Middle East?

The motivation seems to have been a huge wave of sympathy for the Jews after their treatment at the bands of Hitler's Third Reich and a sentimental idea that this was the biblical homeland of the Jews. …

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