Analysis of Exchanges between Novice and Cooperating Teachers during Internships Using the NCATE/NASPE Standards for Teacher Preparation in Physical Education as Guidelines

By Banville, Dominique | Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, June 2006 | Go to article overview

Analysis of Exchanges between Novice and Cooperating Teachers during Internships Using the NCATE/NASPE Standards for Teacher Preparation in Physical Education as Guidelines


Banville, Dominique, Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport


To be recognized as an accredited program, Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) programs in the country must abide by guidelines put forward by the National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE), in collaboration with the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). The guidelines are divided into nine standards and identify a number of outcomes (NASPE, 1998). The purpose of this study was to determine the nature of the exchanges between novice teachers (NTs) and cooperating teachers (CTs), when using the NASPE Standards (1998) as a reference point, and determine if the focus of the exchanges differed over time and according to data source. Six pairs of CTs and their NT participated in the study. Data were collected through recorded conversations between NTs and their CT as well as NTs' logs. Data showed that the majority of conversations focused on planning and instruction (Standard 6) and management and motivation (Standard 4), while few related to diverse learners (Standard 3), growth and development (Standard 2), and communication (Standard 5). The small amount of information shared by CTs in some standards indicates a need for PETE programs to share the guidelines with CTs to make them aware of the importance of offering a variety of topics to interns, because CTs are the primary source of information during this crucial experience.

Key words: adult learning, content analysis, student teaching.

**********

For over a decade Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) programs throughout the U.S. have had the opportunity to earn accreditation through the National Association for Sports and Physical Education (NASPE) in collaboration with the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). The review requires PETE programs to demonstrate that students enrolled in their program meet a set of outcomes grouped under a number of standards.

A few revisions have been made since the first edition of the NCATE/NASPE guidelines was published in 1987. The fourth edition published in 1998 "contains nine standards and reflects consensus among experienced physical educators at all levels as to what teachers need to know, believe, and be able to do" (NASPE, 1998, p. 3). A few differences found in

the new edition include Technology as a new standard and the evidence-based evaluation process now required of PETE programs. This study was performed during the accreditation process of the PETE program involved in the data collection. Because the fourth edition of the NASPE standards was used for the accreditation process, it will be the reference point for this study.

Standard 6 implies that the PETE program provides students with field experiences in order for them to apply, use, or implement planning and instructional skills. Expectations are high for these field experiences, especially the semester-long internship when students are to apply the knowledge learned during their training to develop or improve the skills necessary to become an effective teacher. To succeed in this endeavor, novice teachers (NTs) rely heavily on the supervision of their assigned cooperating teacher (CT).

Theoretical Framework

The importance of being mentored by a more experienced colleague is highlighted during various stages of a teacher's career; however, the support a mentor provides seems to be critical in the early career stage. Data show that between one third and half of all new teachers leave the profession within the first 5 years (Darling-Hammond & Sclan, 1996). For this reason, many schools have induction programs to help newly hired teachers cope with the reality of their new life (Wang & Odell, 2002). Steffy and Wolfe (2001) developed a model pertaining to teaching stages that is useful in understanding the support preservice and in-service teachers likely need regarding their teaching skills and emotional state. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Analysis of Exchanges between Novice and Cooperating Teachers during Internships Using the NCATE/NASPE Standards for Teacher Preparation in Physical Education as Guidelines
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.