Smoking Ups Neuropsychological Toll in Drinkers

By Bates, Betsy | Clinical Psychiatry News, October 2005 | Go to article overview

Smoking Ups Neuropsychological Toll in Drinkers


Bates, Betsy, Clinical Psychiatry News


SANTA BARBARA, CALIF. -- Smoking appears to heighten neuropsychological deficits found in heavy social drinkers, researchers reported at the annual meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism.

Specifically, deficits in executive functioning and balance seen in people who both smoked and drank heavily were significantly worse than those seen in heavy-drinking nonsmokers, said Timothy C. Durazzo, Ph.D., a neuropsychologist and neuroscience researcher at the San Francisco Veterans Administration Medical Center.

"We believe smoking may compound alcohol-induced neurobiologic and neurocognitive dysfunction among individuals with alcohol use disorders," said Dr. Durazzo following the meeting.

The neuropsychological results build on Dr. Durazzo's earlier identification--by MRI and magnetic resonance spectroscopy--of specific brain metabolite deficits in the frontal lobes and subcortical structures of smokers who had recently undergone alcohol detoxification (Alcohol. Clin. Exp. Res. 2004;28:1849-60).

The study concluded that smoking exacerbates alcohol-related frontal lobe neuronal injury and cell membrane damage, but also has an independent adverse effect on subcortical structures.

In the current study, Dr. Durazzo and associates administered neuropsychological tests to 33 socially functioning heavy drinkers, 13 of whom were also daily smokers, and 22 nonsmoking light drinkers.

Heavy drinking was defined as consuming more than 80 drinks per month, but study subjects actually consumed considerably more. Nonsmoking heavy drinkers averaged 141 lifetime drinks per month, while heavy drinkers who smoked drank an estimated 227 drinks per month.

Subjects were mostly in their early 40s with a relatively high level of education (14-15 years, on average). Most were males. No subject suffered a medical condition that could impair neurocognition.

Significant differences between smoking and nonsmoking heavy drinkers were detected on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), computerized version, reflecting executive function; and on the Fregly-Graybiel Ataxia Battery, reflecting balance. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Smoking Ups Neuropsychological Toll in Drinkers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.