Risperidone Eases Some Symptoms of Dementia: Dose of about 1 Mg per Day Brings Improvements, but Risk of Cerebrovascular Events Rises Threefold

By Evans, Jeff | Clinical Psychiatry News, November 2005 | Go to article overview

Risperidone Eases Some Symptoms of Dementia: Dose of about 1 Mg per Day Brings Improvements, but Risk of Cerebrovascular Events Rises Threefold


Evans, Jeff, Clinical Psychiatry News


STOCKHOLM -- Off-label use of low-dose risperidone is effective in treating the behavioral and psychological symptoms of patients with dementia, but clinicians must balance the drug's usefulness with its increased risk of cerebrovascular events, Peter P. De Deyn, M.D., said at the 12th Congress of the International Psychogeriatric Association.

Most of the available data on the treatment of the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) with atypical antipsychotics relates to risperidone, said Dr. De Deyn of the department of neurology at the University of Antwerp (Belgium).

BPSD include verbal and physical aggression, psychotic symptoms, agitation, anxiety, and depression.

Risperidone is approved to treat schizophrenia and bipolar mania associated with bipolar disorder. In May, the Food and Drug Administration opted not to approve risperidone for psychosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD).

In an analysis of pooled data from 1,150 patients in three double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trials, Dr. De Deyn and his associates found that 722 patients who had received risperidone had significantly greater improvement from baseline on the Behavioral Pathology in Alzheimer's Disease Rating Scale (BEHAVE-AD) and the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI) at week 4 through the end of treatment at week 12 than did 428 patients who received placebo (Clin. Neurol. Neurosurg. 2005;107:497-508).

Risperidone patients received a mean dose of 1 mg per day in each trial, said Dr. De Deyn, a speaker and consultant for Janssen Pharmaceutica, which markets risperidone as Risperdal.

In the pooled data set, investigators and caregivers similarly judged risperidone patients as having significantly greater improvement on the Clinical Global Impressions scale than did placebo patients.

At a dose of about 1 mg per day, risperidone also has significantly greater efficacy than haloperidol (Haldol) as shown by results of BEHAVE-AD and CMAI--beginning around week 4-6 of treatment--in two trials of treatment for agitation and aggression in patients with dementia (Neurology 1999;53:946-55; Am. J. Geriatr. Psychiatry 2004;12:509-16).

Psychotic symptoms in patients with psychosis at baseline improved significantly more with risperidone than with placebo in an analysis from one of the trials in the pooled data set that used patients' last available scores as the end point.

In all trials, risperidone did not increase extrapyramidal symptomatology more than placebo. But in trials involving doses of 1 mg of haloperidol per day, the conventional antipsychotic significantly increased the rate of such symptoms. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Risperidone Eases Some Symptoms of Dementia: Dose of about 1 Mg per Day Brings Improvements, but Risk of Cerebrovascular Events Rises Threefold
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.