TUC Claims Older Workers 'Thrown onto Scrapheap' Baby-Boomers Scrape by on Benefits

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), August 15, 2006 | Go to article overview

TUC Claims Older Workers 'Thrown onto Scrapheap' Baby-Boomers Scrape by on Benefits


Byline: BY ALAN JONES Daily Post Correspondent

MORE than a million middle-aged people cannot get a job because employers will not invest in training or make minor adjustments for disabilities, the TUC claimed.

A report by the union warned yesterday that industry and the Government had to defuse the "demographic time-bomb" of an ageing workforce being forced out of jobs and onto benefits.

The study showed that more than 1m unemployed people aged between 50 and 65 wanted a job.

Only one in eight people in this age bracket who were not working had retired early and were classed as "affluent professionals", while many were surviving on state support, said the report. The TUC predicted that, over the next decade, the number of people aged between 50 and 69 would increase by 17%, massively increasing the ratio of pensioners to working people.

TUC deputy general secretary Frances O'Grady said: "Most baby-boomers are not retiring early to cruise around the world or go bungee-jumping. They have been dumped out of work and onto the scrap heap and are scraping by on benefits or small work pensions.

"By refusing to retain and recruit older staff who want to work, employers are accelerating the demographic time -bomb the economy is resting on."

Officials from the TUC called on employers to carry out an age audit of their staff to establish an age profile of their workforce as part of a move to eliminate age discrimination and retain older workers. …

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