One Order/one Bill System Gets a Dress Rehearsal; Newspaper Association of America Tests Its National Newspaper Network Concept with a 75-Newspaper, $1 Million ROP Ad Buy from Chrysler

By Giobbe, Dorothy | Editor & Publisher, March 12, 1994 | Go to article overview

One Order/one Bill System Gets a Dress Rehearsal; Newspaper Association of America Tests Its National Newspaper Network Concept with a 75-Newspaper, $1 Million ROP Ad Buy from Chrysler


Giobbe, Dorothy, Editor & Publisher


IN WHAT IT hopes will be a dress rehearsal for its National Newspaper Network, the Newspaper Association of America successfully has coordinated a deal between Chrysler Corp. and 75 newspapers for an approximate $1 million, three-date run-of-press advertising buy to promote Chrysler's national Minivan sale.

Chrysler-Plymouth will run two half-page, four-color vertical ads, and Dodge will run a full-page ad. The first ads ran Feb. 28, the second group was scheduled to run the week of March 7, and the third set will run the week of March 21.

The buy is the culmination of an NAA effort that began more than a year ago, originating with the defunct Newspaper Advertising Bureau's "Future of Advertising Projects," said Nicholas Cannistraro Jr., NAA chief marketing officer and senior vice president of marketing.

The NAB project targeted specific Categories, including automotive, for newspaper sales efforts.

Slightly more than a year ago, NAA executives and others from the newspaper industry met with Chrysler to explore the idea of a multipaper buy. Chrysler was chosen because, among all the automotive companies, it seemed the most receptive to the multibuy concept.

"We approached Chrysler, and a dialogue ensued between Chrysler and the industry," Cannistraro said. "We made it clear to Chrysler that our effort was to make available any newspapers in any markets they chose to use."

He added that while Chrysler initially expressed interest in the idea, the company voiced familiar concerns about the complexity of multinewspaper buys, including uncompetitive rates, spotty reproduction, the inconvenience of having to deal with too many people, and newspapers' history of not being particularly flexible about position and day-of-week requests.

"The reason that Chrysler was so keenly interested in trying to work with the NAA in spite of the fact that, quite frankly, we were treated rather shabbily by local newspapers for quite some time... is because we know the newspapers are an excellent place to find new-car intenders," said Jim Gulow, director of marketing operations at Chrysler.

"New-car buyers read a lot, and they read a lot of newspapers. That's part of the reason our dealers spend so heavily, and what we wanted to try to do was to put the national image advertising in a forum which would be very synergistic with the dealer's retail advertising, not to replace it but to augment it," Gulow added.

Cannistraro said the NAA team worked to assure Chrysler "we had turned over a new leaf and would work hard to improve our reproduction and compliance with position, day-of-theweek requests and... deliver rates that are more competitive than what [Chrysler] might otherwise think."

"Ultimately, [Chrysler] gave us a list of markets and about 83 papers, based on ADIs [areas of dominant influence] that had high sales development for their products," and a target rate based on what Chrysler has paid on a costper-thousand (CPM) basis at national magazines, reportedly a blended CPM

rate of less than $10 for a quarter page. …

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