We're Praying for World Peace. We Condemn Violence; UNITED AGAINST TERRORISM: Muslims and Sikhs in City Issue Joint Statement

Coventry Evening Telegraph (England), August 23, 2006 | Go to article overview

We're Praying for World Peace. We Condemn Violence; UNITED AGAINST TERRORISM: Muslims and Sikhs in City Issue Joint Statement


Byline: By Barbara Goulden

MUSLIMS and Sikhs in Coventry are praying for world peace in the light of recent terrorist scares.

Amra and David Bone, Muslims who organise the monthly Coventry City Circle meetings, which are open to people of all faiths, have already signed up to a joint statement issued by all mosques in the light of atrocities like the London tube bombings and the American September 11 attacks in 2001.

And last week members of six Sikh gurdwaras came together to express their horror about such "horrific violence."

Both ethnic minority groups have suffered a backlash of public reaction to terrorism - at the weekend

people refused to board a plane because two Asian men were among the passengers.

Yet Mrs Bone, who is chairwoman of the City Circle, says: "We condemn all forms of violence and it is completely forbidden for Muslims to take any violent action against civilians."

The mother-of-four, who lives in Cheylesmore, said that city mosques in Eagle Street, Foleshill, and Cambridge Street, Hill-fields, have united to condemn terrorism and many attend regular community forum meetings with local police.

Last week Harjinder Singh Sehmi, co-ordinator of Coventry's Council of Sikh Gurdwaras, called an emergency meeting to stress how appalled members of the city's six temples had been recent events which have caught every Asian in the backlash. …

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