Plugs& POINTS

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), August 25, 2006 | Go to article overview

Plugs& POINTS


ECONOMY car company Perodua has effectively slashed the cost of its entry-level Kelisa model by pounds 400. That may not seem a huge amount of money in new car terms but it is a fair proportion of the price of a vehicle that now only costs pounds 4,499 in total. Not only has the price been reduced by pounds 200 but the car now comes with metallic paint included, which normally costs an additional pounds 200.

Acknowledged to be the UK's least expensive car to buy and run, the five-door Kelisa comes with twin front air bags, side impact protection, seat belt pretensioners, power steering and an engine immobiliser. It costs 15.1 p per mile to run over three years or 60,000 miles and has an economy figure of about 65mpg from the one-litre petrol engine. Perodua says that the price will go back up again at the end of September.

REMEMBER the 8-track cartridge machine and the cassette player? Well the end of the road could now be in sight for the in-car CD player too. Ford and General Motors are the world's two biggest car companies to ditch them in favour of I-Pod-compatible sound systems. Drivers simply hook up their I-Pod or MP3 player to a lead in the glove box and all of the car's fascia or steering wheel-mounted controls operate as normal. …

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