What? Your Breastmilk Is Bitter? Doc Says It's All in the Mind

Manila Bulletin, August 28, 2006 | Go to article overview

What? Your Breastmilk Is Bitter? Doc Says It's All in the Mind


CEBU CITY -- Mothers who deny their breast to their newborn on the claim that their milk tastes bitter or that they have no milk are just imagining things, a health official pushing breastfeeding of infants said here.

All women, from the moment of giving birth to weaning their offspring, secrete milk, according to Dr. Elaine Teleron, officer-in-charge of the Department of Health in Central Visayas.

This is because during pregnancy, the woman's body undergoes changes, including in their mammary gland. Parturition, or the action or process of giving birth, stimulates the mammary gland to secrete milk in quantities enough to supply the dietary need of the newborn, Teleron said.

The taste of breastmilk is uniform among all women independent of their size, shape, creed or nationality, Teleron said.

"I do not believe in mothers having no milk right after birth. As they are able to give birth, I think it is inherent that they could produce milk. It is sometimes just in the mind," said Department of Health regional officer Dr. Elaine Teleron.

"So much also for mothers who claim to have bitter milk!"

Teleron spoke at the launch of the regional health department's intensified breastfeeding campaign. As part of the campaign, the agency has reinforced its maternal and child health division and encouraged big companies to provide mothers and clients rooms to breasffeed their babies.

Teleron said they intensified their breastfeeding campaign following the issuance of the revised Implementing Rules and Regulations on the National Milk Code.

Aside from encouraging big firms to put up breastfeeeding rooms , Teleron said that they have also deepened their campaign for mothers to exclusively breastfeed their babies for six straight months from birth as this is cheaper, healthier and safer for both mother and baby. …

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