Horse Racing: FAREWELL DUKE; Jumps Legend David Nicholson Dies at 67

The Mirror (London, England), August 29, 2006 | Go to article overview

Horse Racing: FAREWELL DUKE; Jumps Legend David Nicholson Dies at 67


Byline: By DAVID YATES

NICKY HENDERSON yesterday spoke of "a larger-than-life man that gave everything to racing" as the sport mourned the loss of David Nicholson, who died on Sunday, aged 67.

Nicholson, a leading jump jockey for 20 years, went on to even greater success in the training ranks.

As well as winning the 1988 Cheltenham Gold Cup with Charter Party, Nicholson also broke Martin Pipe's stranglehold on the trainers' title.

Having lifted the crown for the 1993-94 campaign from his stateof-the-art Jackdaws Castle stable, he followed up the following term, saddling Viking Flagship to win the Queen Mother Champion Chase during both seasons.

Fellow champion trainer Henderson led the tributes to his old adversary yesterday, saying: "It's a desperately sad day for the sport.

"He was a larger-than-life man who gave everything to racing - he just adored the sport, the horses, the people and the game itself.

"He became a great friend and everyone respected him."

'The Duke', as he became known, was born into racing as the son of legendary trainer 'Frenchie' Nicholson, to whom he was apprenticed. Nicholson's career as a jump jockey got off to the perfect start as he scored on his first ride at Chepstow in 1955.

Over 600 winners followed, including a Whitbread Gold Cup success aboard Mill House in 1967, and two victories for the Queen Mother.

But it was as a trainer that Nicholson wrote his name into racing's record books. …

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