Analysts See 'Disaster' in U.S. Position; Influence of Lobbyists Faulted

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 29, 2006 | Go to article overview

Analysts See 'Disaster' in U.S. Position; Influence of Lobbyists Faulted


Byline: David R. Sands, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The authors of a hotly debated study on the influence of the pro-Israel lobby in Washington said yesterday that the Bush administration's unquestioning support for Israel's military action in Lebanon confirms their thesis that the power of the lobby hurts both U.S. and Israeli national interests.

"Backing Israel to the hilt in the recent war in Lebanon was a disaster for the Lebanese people, served none of our real strategic goals in the region and ended up hurting Israel as well," said John Mearsheimer, political scientist and co-director of the University of Chicago's international security program.

Mr. Mearsheimer and co-author Stephen M. Walt, an international affairs scholar and academic dean at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, showed no signs of backing away from their analysis of the U.S.-Israel lobby at a National Press Club briefing.

The event was sponsored by the Council on American-Islamic Relations, the country's largest Muslim civil rights group.

That analysis, published in the London Review of Books in March, was a lengthy attack on what the authors said was the distorting power of pro-Israel interest groups, think tanks, campaign donors and public officials to slant U.S. policy toward the Jewish state.

The article sparked a heated debate. Some praised the authors for taking on one of the country's most powerful lobbies, while others condemned them for everything from sloppy scholarship to anti-Semitism.

Mr. Walt said the two authors never said that groups such as the American Israel Public Affairs Committee was involved in a conspiracy to drive support of Israel or to stifle debate in the United States, but that the ability of the Israel lobby to influence friends and punish adversaries on Middle East issues was "no secret inside the Beltway. …

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