Marriage Education in the Workplace: Both Marriage and Work Are Based on Relationships, and Improving Workers' Skills in Nurturing Personal Relationships Can Pay Huge Dividends in the Workplace

By Markman, Howard J.; Myrick, Jack et al. | The Journal of Employee Assistance, July 2006 | Go to article overview

Marriage Education in the Workplace: Both Marriage and Work Are Based on Relationships, and Improving Workers' Skills in Nurturing Personal Relationships Can Pay Huge Dividends in the Workplace


Markman, Howard J., Myrick, Jack, Pregulman, Marcie A., The Journal of Employee Assistance


Millions of Americans experience marital distress, conflict, and divorce, and researchers are accumulating data showing that this marital discord and the resulting family fragmentation are associated with a broad spectrum of risks for adults and children. These risks include, but are not limited to, problems with mental health and individual adjustment, child behavior, physical health, and economic success and stability (Cole et al. 1993; Doherty et al. 2002; Forthofer et al. 1996; Halford and Bouma 1997; Markman 2004).

The links between marital functioning and a wide range of outcomes have led to a recognition that marriage has important public health consequences. As a result, policy makers have become much more determined in recent years to implement public sector programs that can help couples--especially high-risk couples--achieve their marital aspirations (for examples of trends and issues, see Markman, Stanley, and Kline 2003).

For the past 25 years, the authors have focused some of their research efforts on the development, evaluation, and dissemination of the Prevention and Relationship Enhancement Program (PREP), supported in part by grants from the National Institutes of Health. We are delighted that a lot of attention is now being paid on federal and state levels to implementing marriage education programs, in which couples are taught skills and principles that research shows underlie healthy marriages.

In part, such efforts have accelerated because of evidence from ongoing NIH-funded research (Markman et al. 2003) that couples can learn these skills and principles, that these skills can be taught in a variety of settings by a variety of service providers (e.g., counselors, clergy, community leaders), and that couples who learn these skills can maintain them over time and may enjoy increased relationship stability Thanks partly to this research, $150 million is being allocated each year for the next five years by the federal government to help low-income couples and individuals who desire to have healthy, happy marriages participate in a research-based marriage education program.

In this article, we propose that marriage education programs can and should be incorporated into the workplace, using examples from two programs based on PREP: Love Your Relationship and Win at Work without losing at home (WIN). Love Your Relationship is a program for couples offered as a weekend retreat or a one-day workshop, while WIN is a program for employers and employees and is presented in the workplace.

Although Love Your Relationship is not workplace-based, partners who participate in the program should not only have better marriages at home but also be able to apply the skills they learn to their work and become more productive, suffer fewer accidents, and use employee assistance program (EAP) services at lower rates. The reverse is true for WIN: married workers (or workers in committed relationships) should not only be more productive, suffer fewer accidents, and use EAP services at lower rates, they should also be able to apply the skills they learn to produce happier marriages and relationships at home.

EMPIRICAL FOUNDATIONS

One strength of the PREP/Love Your Relationship/WIN programs is that they teach individuals and couples the skills to handle difficult situations without engaging in destructive, negative interactions. This focus is based on the fact that negative interactions (such as escalation, criticism, invalidation, and demand-withdraw) have been empirically documented as generic risk factors for both marital and mental distress (Coie et al. 1993; Markman et al. 2003).

Some of the earliest work on this issue served as a foundation of PREP, as Markman (1981) demonstrated in a longitudinal study which showed that destructive communication patterns predicted the development of marital distress and divorce. Based on this research, Markman and his colleagues developed PREP (see Markman 2004 for a review) to focus on--

* Improving communication and conflict management skills (e. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Marriage Education in the Workplace: Both Marriage and Work Are Based on Relationships, and Improving Workers' Skills in Nurturing Personal Relationships Can Pay Huge Dividends in the Workplace
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.