Key to Project Management Puzzle May Lie in Looking beyond the Traditional

Cape Times (South Africa), September 4, 2006 | Go to article overview

Key to Project Management Puzzle May Lie in Looking beyond the Traditional


BYLINE: Dennis Comninos

Today's business leaders are under increasing pressure to perform and deliver on business commitments to boards, shareholders and customers. A big part of achieving these commitments rests with an organisation's ability to maximise the full potential of its projects.

This is according to the latest KPMG Global IT Project Management Survey, which explores trends in programme and project management. It is one of the largest surveys of its kind, with more than 600 organisations in 22 countries participating.

According to the study, though, despite the pivotal importance of reaping the full potential of projects, many organisations are struggling to do so.

For example, 49% of participants had experienced at least one project failure, while only 2% of organisations achieved targeted benefits all the time - benefits are an intended or unintended positive outcome for key stakeholders/shareholders. Value, in turn, is derived from sustainable benefit over time.

Eighty-six percent of organisations lost up to 25% of target benefits across their entire project portfolio.

The report continues that "many (companies) do not even try to measure the value. It means that significant value is being lost since many organisations either do not, or are incapable of, adequately assessing the degree of commitments kept".

The research refers to this as "benefits leakage".

Why is it then that many organisations are experiencing these benefit losses in projects despite their best intentions? Much of the problem lies in the traditional way in which projects are crafted, implemented and measured.

For example, project management has traditionally focused on linear processes and procedures, and been defined by on-time and on-budget measures. In addition, project management has traditionally relied on technology and a niche approach.

Increasing pressures today, however, are effecting changes in the discipline of project management. The factors adding complexity to the business environment include globalisation, an increase in mergers and acquisitions, more stringent accountability and governance requirements, employee empowerment, and the need to manage change and risk.

And it is in this critical area of delivering benefits and value that organisations are now adopting new practices - in essence the definition of success is evolving.

While project success was defined traditionally by on-time and on-budget measures, the definition of success now is meeting promised project benefits - in other words, keeping commitments. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Key to Project Management Puzzle May Lie in Looking beyond the Traditional
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.