A Communication Office in the Year 2010

By Clemons, John G. | Communication World, January-February 1994 | Go to article overview

A Communication Office in the Year 2010


Clemons, John G., Communication World


The walls of my office are painted a soft, powder gray. There are tinted floor-to-ceiling windows on one wall that offer an uncluttered view of healthy, landscaped plants, bushes and flowers. A large nondescript painting is hanging on one wall, and on the wall behind my desk is the framed, embossed company mission. Accent lights are beaming down on the mission, making it appear larger than it is. The office furniture is sleek, modular and seamless. The computer screen and keyboard, telephone, television and VCR, CD player, and slide projector and screen are all hidden from sight, yet immediately available with the touch of a flush keypad installed in the desk. This is the communicator's workspace in the year 2010.

And the professional communicator who works in that office will have to be just as sophisticated and advanced. Public relations and professional communication are on fast forward, propelled by rapid changes in technology and how we conduct business. The after-effects of streamlining, downsizing, re-engineering and all the other "ings" have eroded employee trust and loyalty, presenting communicators with growing -- and tougher -- opportunities and challenges in media relations, employee communication, strategic communication planning, investor relations, marketing, community relations and related areas. Competition for coverage and the successful placement of stories in print and electronic media is fierce. It requires specialists who are focused, detail-oriented and determined. They have to know the businesses of their respective companies, the impact of their products and services on the consumer and the environment, who the competition is and what they are doing, and clearly show how the resulting coverage has improved the bottom line. Companies reach out to business journalists for media positions, and pay them handsomely based on results. Limited success is not tolerated and only those with proven media track records will have access to these positions. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

A Communication Office in the Year 2010
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.