'Higher Education Plays a Massive Role in Wales'

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), September 7, 2006 | Go to article overview

'Higher Education Plays a Massive Role in Wales'


Byline: By ALED BLAKE Western Mail

From top-up fees to strikes - higher education in Wales has faced a number of challenges during the past 12 months. Education reporter Aled Blake spoke to the leader of Welsh higher education, Professor Merfyn Jones, about his plans for the next two years

NEWLY-ELECTED to his post of chairman of Higher Education Wales, Professor Merfyn Jones is unequivocal about the problems - and opportunities - facing universities here.

The Vice-Chancellor of the University of Wales, Bangor, Prof Jones will be chairman of HEW for two years.

HEW is the united voice of higher education institutions in Wales, giving vice-chancellors a single representation when dealing with politicians, civil servants, ministers and businesses.

After a year which has seen continued protests from students over tuition fees and a lengthy national strike from university teaching staff, Prof Jones says universities can now concentrate on doing what 'they were established' to do.

'Universities and higher education institutions are incredibly important in Wales, and I'm not sure our role is always understood,' he explained. 'I'm not sure people are genuinely aware of the huge financial and economic impact of higher education.

'The sector in Wales has a turnover of about pounds 800m - less than half of that comes from the Welsh Assembly Government.

'Of course, that is an incredibly important investment from the Assembly Government, which is made through the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales.

'Higher education is competing for staff, consultancies, research and students, and it raises an enormous amount of money for the Welsh economy as major employers in their area.

'In Wales we have institutions all over the country and it's important their benefits are spread across rural Wales as well as the urban areas,' he added.

Prof Jones, 58, started his university career at Swansea in 1971, working on an historical research project on coal mining in South Wales Valleys - work, of which, he says he is extremely proud.

He then moved to Liverpool University where he stayed for 15 years before moving back to his native North Wales and Bangor in the early 1990s, where he moved up the ladder from Professor of Welsh History to his position now as the university's chief executive.

Prof Jones says he is looking forward to his time as chairman of HEW.

He said, 'I see it as a very important challenge to be able to get the sector's point of view across to politicians and opinion formers of all sorts and to the public in Wales as well.

'I am not sure people are aware that higher education is a competitive business and that we not are just sitting here absorbing public money.

'We are wealth generators in our own right and the big challenge for us in the future is to work with all the partners to turn the Welsh economy around into the kind of economy we are all seeking.

'Higher education has a tremendous responsibility in ensuring we work with our partners to make that happen.'

After the settlement in the Assembly over tuition fees in Wales, came the strike from lecturers. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

'Higher Education Plays a Massive Role in Wales'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.