East African Co-Operation Resumes

African Business, February 1994 | Go to article overview

East African Co-Operation Resumes


Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda, once partners in the now-defunct East African Community (EAC), have pledged to renew their co-operation. Although many have heralded the action as a revival of the EAC, the promises made so far are much more loosely based.

President Moi of Kenya, President Museveni of Uganda and President Mwinyi of Tanzama met in the Tanzanian city of Arusha to express their commitment to renewed co-operation.

President Moi, in an address to the Kenyan nation on Jamhuri Day, 12 December 1993, spoke of the pledges made in Arusha. He was speaking on the occasion of the 30th anniversary of Kenya's independence. President Museveni and President Mwinyi were present at the celebrations.

"Regional peace and political stability can only be realised when neighbouring countries are willing to co-operate for the mutual benefit of their people," he proclaimed. "It is against this background that I, together with my brothers and colleagues, President Hassan Mwinyi of Tanzania and President Yoweri Museveni of Uganda, both of whom are here with us, met recently in Arusha and resolved to renew our co-operation as a basis for creating a bigger economic bloc. "I am grateful to my colleagues for their statesmanship in this matter. I would like to assure them of Kenya's determination to play her part for the success of this renewed East African cooperation," President Moi declared.

"This newly found co-operation calls for a unified approach to issues that affect the lives of the people of our three countries. We are brothers and sisters, and we must partake of our successes and failures as such," he noted.

"As a first step in that direction, there is a need for Ministers in charge of Finance from the three sister states in future to consult and release their annual budgetary proposals simultaneously, as was the case in the past. This action will definitely point out the areas and extent of co-operation required," President Moi explained.

Reflecting on Kenya's 30 years of independence, President Moi pointed out that two-thirds of the population of Kenya were born after independence. While accepting that the future will be challenging, the President asserted that the basic economic and social foundation for the years to come has been established. The challenges to be faced include the creation of adequate employment opportunities and "perhaps the most fundamental challenge of all - that of building a united nation".

President Moi declared, "In the past, we have been basically a one-party state. Today, we have a multiparty political system which means that there is, and always will be, a ruling party while other parties are in opposition." While accepting that a multiparty political system involves competition, he stressed that "that competition must not be carried out at the expense of people's interests, now and in the future. Instead of such negative politics, all leaders, whether in politics, religion or other professions, should work together towards the promotion of positive thinking and action by our people."

He added, "The truth of the matter is that our people need peace and food security for their livelihood - hence, the urgent need to address ourselves to important issues such as job creation, achievement of national food security, elimination of poverty, diversification of our exports through industrialisation and, very fundamentally, the removal of tribalism, nepotism and other antinational and antisocial practices from our country."

The President stressed that Kenya - and Africa as a whole - must find its own solutions to its problems. "this is not to say", he continued, "that we do not value the support we get from donors by way of development assistance. I would like to take this opportunity to thank again those donors who met recently in Paris at the Consultative Group meeting for Kenya for agreeing on the resumption of financial support to our country. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

East African Co-Operation Resumes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.