Violence in Middle East; "In Spite of Its Majestic Record, No Arab State Was Ever Again to Provide Unity for Islam after the 10th Century.Arab Unity Was to Remain Only a Dream." - J.M. Roberts, History of the World

Manila Bulletin, September 19, 2006 | Go to article overview

Violence in Middle East; "In Spite of Its Majestic Record, No Arab State Was Ever Again to Provide Unity for Islam after the 10th Century.Arab Unity Was to Remain Only a Dream." - J.M. Roberts, History of the World


Byline: HECTOR R.R. VILLANUEVA

AS renowned British historian, J.M. Roberts recounted, "The Abbasids were a violent lot....In 750 AD the new caliph, Abu-al-Abbos, "shedder of blood," defeated and executed the last Ummayad caliph....A dinner party was held for the defeated males of Ummayad, but the guests were murdered before the first course which was then served to their hosts."

Middle East history is so replete with violence, religious strifes, invasions, political rivalries, and revolutions that Muslim sensitivities today to opinions, cartoons, and inadvertent comments are overreactions and exaggerated outrage.

For these reasons, Pope Benedict XVI has no reason to apologize for quoting a medieval text or historical fact that was neither malicious nor racist nor intentional.

The rest of the world cannot always apologize, or recoil or react defensively for every unintentional remark or actuation that may ostensively offend Islamists when there are wars, violence, and more important burning issues to address and resolve.

However, the Arabs cannot always be blamed for their militancy and sensitiveness.

While the West, the Bush administration in particular, is paranoid over Islam-driven War on Terror; obsessed with American-style democracy, and human rights for "client" states, and xenophobic over Iranian and North Korean nuclear programs, the United States and its Western allies do not question or sanction or investigate Israel's war policies, illegal invasion of independent states, Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD), and nuclear arsenal.

Thus, Arabs generally consider these tendencies as highly hypocritical, obsessively pro-Israel, and anti-Arab.

The Christian world should take up the cudgels, not for the Vatican but for Pope Benedict XVI who intended no insult or malice towards Islam - since, after all, there were Christian Arabs before there were Muslims. …

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Violence in Middle East; "In Spite of Its Majestic Record, No Arab State Was Ever Again to Provide Unity for Islam after the 10th Century.Arab Unity Was to Remain Only a Dream." - J.M. Roberts, History of the World
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