Vent Your Spleen

Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England), September 19, 2006 | Go to article overview

Vent Your Spleen


Can anybody tell me how many laws, rules, regulations and restrictions and must-nots there are in this country?

A new one out is about kids in cars having to be strapped in up to the age of 12. You can't binge drink, you can't smoke, you can't eat fast foods, you can't eat sugary foods. It just goes on and on. There seems to be one or two every week.

How many restrictions are there in this country? If somebody can answer that, he or she must be marvellous. There are thousands of them. As far as saying we mustn't eat this food or that food, there are thousands starving in the world with no food.

A N, Newcastle.

N E G of Killingworth, in Friday's Vent your Spleen, claimed the three main parties care nothing for the English. As a former Tory councillor and activist for 20 years, I can confirm he is correct about the Conservatives.

I left that party just after the University Tuition Bill was forced through with Scottish votes. The Conservatives were in a position to raise hell, but they bottled it. They believed in Britain and are desperate for seats in Scotland and Wales. Westminster is now nothing more than an extension of the Scottish Parliament. The English should know that England is the only British country that would get richer if the UK broke up. Scotland and Wales would be poorer.

Because the Tories have been too spineless to back up the English they deserve to be in permanent opposition. If only someone would form an English National Party ( if only more groups would request an English Parliament.

M D, Gosforth.

On the subject of British Justice, the letter in the Chronicle by J P of Cramlington is very true. It is a national problem ( usually, but not always, on council estates and in high-rise flats.

As said in the letter, the police are difficult to find on the ground, especially at the time they are needed. And the community police? Well, they have no powers of arrest so the young hoodlums just laugh at them. …

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