Opinion: The Marketing Society Forum - Why Is There Still Inequality in Pay between Men and Women?

Marketing, September 20, 2006 | Go to article overview

Opinion: The Marketing Society Forum - Why Is There Still Inequality in Pay between Men and Women?


Despite an across-the-board rise in marketers' salaries, the disparity between men's and women's pay in the industry has increased.

JERRY WRIGHT, BRAND DIRECTOR, BIRDS EYE

Birds Eye doesn't have any such inequality. Three out of four people in our marketing team are women and we place great emphasis on flexibility for those with families. Most of our customers are women, too, so we need to have good female representation.

I see no reason why there should be pay inequality in any company. At least 50% of the talent in this industry is accounted for by women, so it's vital to ensure they can have fulfilling careers and personal lives.

There are less enlightened companies that view women's requirements for flexibility as an obstacle to progress and do not reward them in the same way as men. This is incredibly short-sighted because of the talent they represent.

JAN GOODING, JOINT MANAGING PARTNER, ANTENNAE

When I was head of brand experience at BT, it took great care to look at gender during pay reviews.

My team there was dominated by women, whom I have noticed are more reluctant than men to confront pay issues directly; they talk generally about career progression and expect everything else to fall into place.

Women are emotive, while men are far more dispassionate and upfront. In general, women are more loyal to organisations and often better performers, but if they discover pay inequality based on gender, they will leave rather than try to rectify it.

Also, women who return to a job after having a child often find their career progression frozen. …

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Opinion: The Marketing Society Forum - Why Is There Still Inequality in Pay between Men and Women?
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