Waiting for Digital Photography

By Aaland, Mikkel | Folio: the Magazine for Magazine Management, March 1, 1994 | Go to article overview

Waiting for Digital Photography


Aaland, Mikkel, Folio: the Magazine for Magazine Management


Nobody doubts the potential of digital photography--just listen to an executive at a recent industry conclave on the subject: "Portable digital cameras are poised to take photography to a whole new level," says Rajiv Mehta, a marketing manager with Apple Computer. "Like the first Kodak Brownie introduced a hundred years ago," Mehta continues, "the digital camera will reach out to an entirely new group of users."

Why the interest in going digital? The answer is economic. Digital imaging is going to save publishers big dollars. Jerome Skapof, executive vice president/sales of Kanimage, says that by "using a digital camera, we can demonstrate a 66 percent gain in productivity and a 45 percent savings in cost" for a medium-size studio. Savings come from not having to buy film, and not having to buy equipment and chemicals needed to process film. Man hours are saved, too, because digitally shot images do not require processing and scanning. "Using a digital camera could be a question of economic survival," says Skapof.

But who is this group of "new users" that Mehta is talking up? And where is the market for digital cameras? For now, don't look to photojournalists. Most of the vendors are focusing on less demanding consumer markets, so it's going to be a while before digital cameras capable of producing professional quality images quickly and conveniently will become widely available. Kodak executive Pete Jameson, for instance, thinks a resolution of one or two megapixels "is about right" for the systems his company is developing, but images captured at such a relatively low resolution will max out at 150 to 175 line screens. With advanced printing techniques like waterless now permitting line screens up to 600 and beyond, that's not going to cut it for high-quality color magazines. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Waiting for Digital Photography
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.