Siberia: From Edge to Centre

By Giddens, Anthony | New Statesman (1996), September 11, 2006 | Go to article overview

Siberia: From Edge to Centre


Giddens, Anthony, New Statesman (1996)


I am sitting in the sunshine beneath a sky of perfect blue. The temperature is well into the twenties Celsius and I am surrounded by greenery. Behind me are attractive university buildings where, it being the first day of the new term, students come and go.

I am not in California, but Siberia. Siberia is quite unlike the image most people in the west have of it: a land of permanent ice and snow fit only for exiles. The far north may come close, but Siberia stretches a long way south and I am in the campus town of Novosibirsk, set away from the main city, which is home to about a million people.

The climate is similar to that of Wisconsin in the US--occasionally very cold in winter, but mostly sunny and dry--and Novosibirsk itself also resembles Madison, home of the University of Wisconsin. It is an elite university, established in the 1950s as a centre of scientific research.

I have come to give a series of lectures on globalisation. They are well-attended and the discussions afterwards are lively. Merely being here drives home what globalisation means, for the place is acquiring a global significance. It borders China and India, whose political and economic importance is growing apace, so Siberia is no longer on the edge, but right in the centre. It also has 90 per cent of Russia's vast oil and natural-gas resources.

After Russia's setbacks in the 1990s, President Vladimir Putin is pursuing a path of authoritarian modernisation back to great-power status, and oil and gas are central to that ambition. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Siberia: From Edge to Centre
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.