Washington People

By Adler, Joe | American Banker, October 2, 2006 | Go to article overview

Washington People


Adler, Joe, American Banker


Political Lies

Candidates all across America this fall are sporting big smiles, shaking hands, and saying how great it is to be on the campaign trail.

Don't believe them, Rep. Barney Frank told executives recently in a speech to the National Association of Federal Credit Unions.

The lead Democrat on the House Financial Services Committee said candidates like to tell at least two lies during any campaign. "I'm glad to have an opponent! I love campaigning!" is the first.

"The next time you hear someone say how much he or she loves campaigning, remember that person is either a liar or a sociopath," said Rep. Frank, who has been elected to his Massachusetts seat 12 times.

"The next question for that person should be: 'If you like campaigning so much, how often do you do it when you don't have to?' When was the last time you saw a candidate who was unopposed standing out on a street corner hollering to people on their way to work?"

As for the second lie, Rep. Frank told the audience to think twice when they hear a candidate compliment an opponent in a tight race.

"The second lie is: 'Oh yeah, we ran against each other, but we're good friends,' " he said.

Cancer Run

Dozens of financial services lobbyists and congressional staff members will attempt to raise thousands of dollars in Washington this week for a cause that has nothing to do with political campaigns.

Karl Kaufmann, an associate with Sidley Austin LLP who lobbies on consumer credit and payment card issues for MasterCard Inc. and TransUnion LLC, is hosting an Oktoberfest event to raise money for a marathon he plans to run for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society's Team in Training to find a cure for blood cancers.

Mr. Kaufmann, who was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in January 2005, said Friday that so far industry representatives, House Financial Services staff members, and bank lobbyists have helped him raise $25,000.

"It's absolutely phenomenal how generous people can be," he said.

Buttons Popping

We know regulatory relief legislation is an exciting topic, but Rep. Jeb Hensarling, R-Tex., was positively bursting with pride last week after the House agreed to the Senate's scaled-back version of a bill he co-sponsored. …

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