RUBBISH ..BUT IS IT ART? Acclaimed Turner Prize Entry Is Cases Full of Dross off Street

The Mirror (London, England), October 3, 2006 | Go to article overview

RUBBISH ..BUT IS IT ART? Acclaimed Turner Prize Entry Is Cases Full of Dross off Street


Byline: By TOM PARRY

THERE are already plenty of people out there who think modern art is a load of rubbish...

And here's one artist who seems determined to prove it really is a waste.

Turner Prize contender Rebecca Warren has filled five display cases with dross she found on her studio floor and the road outside.

The rubbish includes bits of fluff, dust, hair, plastic, twigs, woollen pom-poms and a discarded cherry stone. There are also "chewing gum gobbets" made of clay.

But while most of us would put that stuff in a bin, Warren insists it has a place in an art gallery.

The 41-year-old, from Hackney, East London, said: "I'm actually interested in what a bit of fluff and a bit of twig put in a particular order can mean.

"For somebody, it could mean one thing, and for somebody else, it could mean something else."

Warren's exhibition went on display at Tate Britain in London yesterday. …

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