U.S. Wins a United Front on Iran; China, Russia to Join Push for Sanctions

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 3, 2006 | Go to article overview

U.S. Wins a United Front on Iran; China, Russia to Join Push for Sanctions


Byline: Nicholas Kralev, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The United States is confident that Russia and China will join it in pushing for U.N. sanctions against Iran if it does not agree to suspend enriching uranium this week, a senior U.S. official said yesterday.

R. Nicholas Burns, undersecretary of state for political affairs, also said the U.N. Security Council will insist on a clear answer to its demand that Iran suspend its enrichment activity. A "maybe" will be considered a "no," he said.

"For four months now, we've been waiting for an answer," Mr. Burns told editors and reporters at a luncheon at The Washington Times. "We've said, if they don't suspend enrichment, we'll take them to the Security Council and sanction them. We do believe we have Russian and Chinese support for that."

The five permanent council members - the United States, Britain, France, Russia and China - along with Germany on June 1 offered Iran a package of economic and political incentives if it suspends enrichment and asked for an answer by the end of July.

When there was no answer, the council passed a resolution threatening sanctions under Article 41 of Chapter 7 of the U.N. Charter and gave Tehran another deadline, Aug. 31. But Iran began negotiating "seriously" with the Europeans only in mid-September, Mr. Burns said, and the Bush administration decided to wait a little longer.

At a dinner in New York on Sept. 18, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and her five counterparts agreed that the first week of October would be the absolute deadline for Iran "to say yes or no," Mr. Burns said.

"She agreed with the Russians, Chinese and Europeans," he said of Miss Rice, "that, if Iran said no, we would all go to sanctions together at the Security Council."

He said a scheduled meeting this week between Javier Solana, the European Union's foreign policy chief, and Ali Larijani, Iran's top nuclear negotiator, should bring "clarity."

"If [Iran's answer] is maybe, it's a no," Mr. Burns said. "If it's 'We'd like to negotiate this further,' it has been negotiated for four months. At some point, you have to draw the line. So I think you'll have the answer by the end of the week."

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad repeatedly has rejected the calls for suspending enrichment but denies that his country is pursuing a nuclear weapon.

Mr. Burns rejected a suggestion by Kazakh President Nursultan Nazarbayev, made in an interview with The Times last week, that Iran be offered a deal similar to the one Kazakhstan made when it gave up its nuclear arsenal in the 1990s. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

U.S. Wins a United Front on Iran; China, Russia to Join Push for Sanctions
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.