College Students Begin Move-In Madness

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), September 21, 2006 | Go to article overview

College Students Begin Move-In Madness


Byline: Greg Bolt The Register-Guard

Tens of thousands of college students begin their annual fall migration today, and the flyways will be packed.

That means anyone who isn't moving a student into the University of Oregon residence halls would do well to avoid Franklin Boulevard.

The same will hold true Monday, when classes start and anyone who isn't attending Lane Community College should stay away from the Interstate 5 and East 30th Avenue area.

The annual UO move-in crush typically brings Franklin to a standstill throughout the day, especially within a mile or two of Agate Street, the north-south connector that's the main artery for campus housing. Anyone who doesn't have to be in the area is urged to take a different route.

This year's tangle could be even worse than usual because of recent changes in traffic rules. With the construction of Lane Transit District's new Bus Rapid Transit line down Franklin, westbound drivers are no longer allowed to turn left onto Agate.

Instead, those drivers need to turn a block sooner, where East 13th Avenue angles into Franklin in front of the former Williams Bakery building. That will take cars to the four-way stop at Agate, near the north end of the Hamilton housing complex.

Eugene police and campus security officers will direct traffic and try to keep things moving smoothly. However, cars will have extreme difficulty getting onto Agate Street and traffic will be backed up in the eastbound lane of Franklin Boulevard. The right-hand lane of Franklin eastbound will be reserved for UO dormitory traffic only.

A similar traffic jam occurs near LCC on the first day of classes and usually continues for the first week. Cars exiting I-5 at East 30th Avenue often back up onto the freeway during the morning rush, from about 8 a.m. to 10 a.m., and those who do not need to be in the area are urged to avoid it.

LCC advises students and employees to use the bus if possible and, if not, to carpool or ride a bike. …

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