This Is London's MESSAGEBOARD; Freak Animals Belong Only in Fiction

The Evening Standard (London, England), October 6, 2006 | Go to article overview

This Is London's MESSAGEBOARD; Freak Animals Belong Only in Fiction


This is London's MESSAGEBOARD

email your views to tellus@thisislondon.co.uk or log on to thisislondon.co.uk/chat

Freak animals belong only in fiction

Should scientists create the Frankenbunny?

THE plan to mix human stem cells and rabbit eggs is disgusting and should be illegal. What they are planning on doing is creating "chimeric" embryos, which would be 99.9 per cent human and 0.1 per cent rabbit.

If it is 99.9 per cent human this is human testing on embryos, therefore it's breeding humans to test on.

I feel sick at the thought of it.

Germaine, Tottenham

ALL animal testing should be banned. It's completely unnecessary.

If this report is accurate and the embryo is going to be 99.9 per cent human, why do we need to include a rabbit cell at all?

I think we should let illness happen and stop trying to change the natural order of things.

Clara, Roehampton

ONCE again, innocent animals will be used for some bizarre experiments.

Scientists should focus their knowledge of the biology of humans on developing faster, more accurate computer models with which to explore diseases.

Kat, UK

WHEN it comes down to it we are given the choice of either creating stem cells from human embryos or non human. "Aborting" a human embryo to get at the cells has caused such controversy that this seems like a reasonable way forward.

There is no way anyone could object to the destruction of a mutant half-human half-rabbit embryo.

Chris, London

HAVING worked in medical research I am of the firm belief that anything that will appease the suffering that certain diseases bring to the individuals and families can do nothing but good.

Karen, UK

I AM behind this 100 per cent if it helps with research and can find a cure for diseases like Alzheimer's.

Issy, West Ham

I AM totally for this idea. It is bizarre though that they chose rabbits and I would love to know why. As much as I hope they have great successes, I do worry what this interspecies genetic mixing may produce in the way of side effects? Will we create some sort of human/rabbit flu pandemic with our meddlings?

Lugger, Finchley

WE NEED to be thankful we are not Americans and can undertake exciting-and important work such as this without the Christian Right imposing their views on us.

Gary, London

I DON'T mind them researching this as it is important we learn more about stem cells and the way they work.

Rowan, UK

Ringtones: love them or hate them?

I'VE got loads of ringtones and change them round all the time. The mosquito one is wicked as not everyone can hear it and it really bugs the hell out of people who can.

Billbod, London

LOVE them! At the moment I have a track from the new Muse album as my ringtone, and every time my phone rings it gets me singing (not whining!).

Emily, Maidstone

A FEW years back, when c2c still had slam-door trains, I could hear the delightful Mission: Impossible theme chirping out from someone's phone. Three times it rang. Eventually, it was answered. The audible half of the conversation went: "Allo! ... yeah ... three times? ... nah ...

couldn't hear it." I suspect this man feels the Crazy Frog is some kind of modern-day hero. …

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