History of Life in Loudoun; County's Roots Are in Agriculture

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), October 8, 2006 | Go to article overview

History of Life in Loudoun; County's Roots Are in Agriculture


Byline: Karen Goldberg Goff, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Long before it was one of the fastest-growing and wealthiest counties in America, Loudoun County, Va., was an agricultural hub and witness to Civil War battles.

That rich history is recounted at the Loudoun Museum, a collection tucked into a historic building in the heart of Leesburg. Household items, maps, books and documents all tell Loudoun's story.

"We have about 7,000 items," says Karen Quanbeck MacLeod, the museum's executive director.

The entire collection is not on display at once, but is rotated through in themed exhibits, Ms. MacLeod says.

The biggest part of the museum is devoted to "Centuries of Change," which tells the story of Loudoun's history. "Centuries of Change" starts at the beginning, when American Indians inhabited the land.

Artifacts and documents explain Loudoun's role in the Revolutionary War. There are notes from Thomas Jefferson's 1808 journal, as well as Continental currency.

The county's agricultural history is shown in items such as spinning supplies and farm log books. The Civil War damaged much of Loudoun's agriculture, but the county quickly recovered, and by 1870 the wheat harvest was double that of 1860s, even with a lack of horses and equipment, the museum placards explain.

The museum gives a local view of Virginia and American history events. In the part of the exhibit devoted to slavery in the county, materials tell how the western part of the county with a large German and Quaker population was quite divided over the issue.

There is a large case with Civil War artifacts, including bullet shells and Union parole papers from a Confederate prisoner of war. Materials also recount the running battles in southern Loudoun, as well as the "Burning Raid" of November 1864 that burned hundreds of farms in the county.

Younger visitors will appreciate the Discovery Room, which replicates a 19th-century home. There is a hearth and utensils in the kitchen. There are costumes to wear and household items to use. Children can do "chores" as well as play with Colonial-era playthings. The room was created using the book "John Janney's Virginia: An American Farm Lad's Life in the Early 19th Century," as a guide, says Ms. MacLeod.

There is still time this fall to enjoy the newly opened Colonial Children's Garden just outside the museum. The garden, installed in August and dedicated in late September, features herbs, flowers, shrubs and trees that are native to the United States or imported by the first settlers, Ms. …

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